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Press Release Detail

Monday, November 24, 2014  08:09

Issued: Monday, December 27, 2010  00:00
Version#

Western Washington Weather Year in Review

 

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
 NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
 1130 AM PST TUE DEC 21 2010
 
 ...2010 WESTERN WASHINGTON WEATHER YEAR IN REVIEW...
 
 THE YEAR BEGAN WITH A TRANQUIL AND MILD EL NINO WINTER WITH NO
 SIGNIFICANT WEATHER EVENTS AND FINISHED WITH A MUCH MORE ACTIVE LA
 NINA WINTER SEASON WITH THE SEASONS FIRST COLD WEATHER OUTBREAK...A
 WIDESPREAD FLOOD EVENT AND A FEW STRONG WIND EVENTS. 
 
 DURING THE YEAR...ADVERSE WEATHER RESULTED IN ONLY ONE FATALITY AND
 THREE INJURIES. THE LONE FATALITY WAS THE RESULT OF THE NIGHT OF DEC
 13 SQUALL LINE THAT KNOCKED A TREE DOWN ONTO A KITSAP COUNTY MOBILE
 HOME. PROPERTY DAMAGE FROM ADVERSE WEATHER WAS QUITE LIMITED WITH
 JUST OVER 270000 DOLLARS REPORTED THROUGH OCTOBER. PROPERTY DAMAGE
 RESULTS WERE NOT YET AVAILABLE FOR THE FAR MORE ACTIVE NOVEMBER AND
 DECEMBER WEATHER EVENTS.
 
 THE YEAR BEGAN WITH EL NINO IN PLACE. EL NINO USUALLY BRINGS WARMER
 THAN AVERAGE TEMPERATURES AND THAT WAS THE CASE IN WESTERN
 WASHINGTON. JANUARY AND FEBRUARY TEMPERATURES RANGED BETWEEN 3 AND 6
 DEGREES ABOVE AVERAGE WHILE PRECIPITATION WAS CLOSE TO NORMAL.
 SEATAC HAD THE WARMEST AVERAGE TEMPERATURE EVER WITH 47.0 DEGREES
 BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD IN 2006 OF 46.6 DEGREES. OLYMPIA HAD
 THE SECOND WARMEST JANUARY EVER AT 43.7 DEGREES AND QUILLAYUTE NEAR
 FORKS ALSO HAD THE SECOND WARMEST JANUARY EVER AT 46.3 DEGREES.
 
 THEN CAME THE STRONG CONTRAST IN SPRING...COOL AND WET. AVERAGE
 WESTERN WASHINGTON TEMPERATURES IN MAY AND JUNE RANGED BETWEEN 1 AND
 3 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL WHILE PRECIPITATION WAS ONE TO 2.5 INCHES
 ABOVE AVERAGE. SEATAC AIRPORT DID NOT REACH 75 DEGREES OR GREATER
 UNTIL JUNE 23RD...THE LATEST EVER.
 
 SUMMER - MANY FEEL WE DID NOT HAVE ONE. YET THERE WERE TWO HEAT
 WAVES WITH HIGH TEMPERATURES IN THE 90S...ONE IN JULY AND THE OTHER
 IN AUGUST. IN FACT THE BULK OF THE RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES SET IN
 2010 WERE DURING THE SUMMER - SEE THE LIST BELOW. SEATAC AIRPORT
 AVERAGES ONLY THREE DAYS PER YEAR OF 90 DEGREES OR ABOVE - 2010 HAD
 SIX DAYS IN THE 90S AND 21 DAYS OF 80 OR BETTER WITH AN AVERAGE OF
 25 DAYS PER YEAR. WESTERN WASHINGTON JULY AND AUGUST TEMPERATURES
 AVERAGED LESS THAN ONE DEGREE BELOW NORMAL WHILE RAINFALL WAS BELOW
 NORMAL. SO THE SUMMER OF 2010 WAS BASICALLY...AN AVERAGE ONE.
 
 THEN THE WEATHER TURNED AGAIN THIS FALL WITH PLENTY OF RAIN.
 SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER RAINFALL IN WESTERN WASHINGTON WAS BETWEEN 2
 AND 5 INCHES ABOVE NORMAL. SEATAC AIRPORT HAD ITS THIRD WETTEST
 SEPTEMBER EVER WITH 4.80 INCHES - JUST OVER THREE INCHES ABOVE
 NORMAL.
 
 NOVEMBER WAS MUCH DRIER BUT HAD QUITE THE CONTRAST IN TEMPERATURES.
 SEATAC AIRPORT HIT 74 DEGREES ON THE 3RD AND THEN ON THE 24TH
 PLUNGED TO 14 - A 60 DEGREE RANGE IN ONE MONTH - THE GREATEST EVER
 ON RECORD. LA NINAS INFLUENCE BEGAN TO BE FELT AS THE SEASONS FIRST
 COLD WEATHER OUTBREAK GRIPPED THE AREA DURING THE THIRD WEEK OF THE
 MONTH WITH LOWLAND SNOW FALLING IN AREAS FROM THE 20TH THROUGH THE
 22ND. SOME PARTS OF THE NORTHERN OLYMPIC PENINSULA GOT CLOSE TO A
 FOOT OF SNOW WHILE MUCH OF THE REST OF WESTERN WASHINGTON GOT
 BETWEEN ONE AND THREE INCHES OF SNOW. DESPITE THE WARM START TO THE
 MONTH...AVERAGE TEMPERATURES WERE GENERALLY ONE OR TWO DEGREES BELOW
 NORMAL FOR THE MONTH THANKS TO THE COLD FINISH TO THE MONTH. TYPICAL
 OF LA NINAS...THE MOUNTAINS ALSO GOT A HEALTHY DOSE OF SNOW AND MANY
 SKI AREAS OPENED BY THANKSGIVING WEEKEND.
 
 DECEMBER ONCE AGAIN TURNED WET AND MILD. AN ATMOSPHERIC RIVER - AKA
 PINEAPPLE EXPRESS - HIT THE REGION ON THE 11TH AND 12TH. THE
 MOUNTAINS RECEIVED BETWEEN 6 AND 12 INCHES OF RAIN WHILE THE
 LOWLANDS GOT BETWEEN ONE AND FOUR INCHES. 17 RIVERS EXCEEDED FLOOD
 STAGE WITH THE STILLAGUAMISH SETTING A NEW RECORD. MANY SMALLER
 STREAMS ALSO SPILLED OVER THEIR BANKS AND OVER 50 LANDSLIDES WERE
 REPORTED...SOME CLOSING ROADWAYS AND THE MAIN NORTH-SOUTH RAIL LINE.
 
 DECEMBER ALSO HAD A FEW STRONG WIND EVENTS...THE FIRST ON THE NIGHT
 OF THE 13TH AS A SQUALL LINE MOVED INLAND PRODUCING A BRIEF PERIOD
 OF SUSTAINED 25 TO 35 MPH WINDS WITH GUSTS TO 50 MPH THOUGH ONE GUST
 TO 70 MPH WAS RECORDED AT HOQUIAM AIRPORT. THE WINDS BLEW A NUMBER
 OF TREES DOWN AND KNOCKED POWER OUT TO OVER 100000 CUSTOMERS IN
 PARTS OF WESTERN WASHINGTON. THEN AN EASTERLY ENUMCLAW WIND EVENT
 OCCURRED ON THE NIGHT OF THE 17TH...AGAIN BLOWING DOWN TREES AND
 EVEN A NUMBER OF POWER POLES IN PARTS OF THE EAST PUGET SOUND
 LOWLANDS LIKE ENUMCLAW...NORTH BEND AND MAPLE VALLEY. UP TO 112000
 CUSTOMERS LOST POWER DURING THIS EAST WIND EVENT OUT OF THE CASCADE
 PASSES.
 
 WHEN COMBINING THE MILD START TO THE YEAR...THE COOL SPRING AND
 NOVEMBER...AND WARM DECEMBER THUS FAR...TEMPERATURES IN WESTERN
 WASHINGTON WERE ABOUT ONE DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE YEAR. MOST OF
 THE RECORD TEMPERATURES SET DURING THE YEAR WERE HIGH TEMPERATURE
 RECORDS WITH VERY FEW RECORD LOWS SET. IN FACT...BELLINGHAM HAD NO
 RECORD LOW TEMPERATURES THIS YEAR AT ALL. PRECIPITATION FOR THE YEAR
 WILL BE WELL ABOVE NORMAL WITH THE REGION RANGING FROM 6 TO 15
 INCHES ABOVE NORMAL BEFORE THE END OF DECEMBER. A NUMBER OF DAILY
 RECORD PRECIPITATION RECORDS WERE SET ACROSS WESTERN WASHINGTON.
 
 THERE WERE TWO WEAK TORNADOES IN THE STATE IN 2010...ONE OUTSIDE OF
 MOSES LAKE AND THE OTHER NEAR TOLEDO. WASHINGTON AVERAGES BETWEEN
 ONE AND TWO TORNADOES PER YEAR. THERE WERE ALSO FIVE FUNNEL CLOUDS
 REPORTED STATEWIDE. A FUNNEL CLOUD IS DEFINED AS A RAPIDLY ROTATING
 COLUMN OF AIR NOT REACHING THE GROUND. FOR THE FIRST TIME IN TWO
 YEARS...THERE WERE NO LIGHTNING FATALITIES OR INJURIES - A SIGN THAT
 LIGHTNING AWARENESS PROGRAMS ARE HELPING REDUCE LOSS OF LIFE AND
 INJURY.
 
 A LIST OF SIGNIFICANT 2010 EVENTS IN WESTERN WASHINGTON IS GIVEN
 BELOW...AS WELL AS RECORD TEMPERATURES AND PRECIPITATION FOR
 SELECTED LOCATIONS.
 
 SIGNIFICANT EVENTS
 
 TORNADOES/WATERSPOUTS/FUNNEL CLOUDS ACROSS WASHINGTON
 
 APR 24 - 2 MILES NORTHEAST OF EVERETT - SNOHOMISH COUNTY
 A FUNNEL CLOUD WAS SPOTTED BETWEEN MARYSVILLE AND EVERETT.
 
 MAY 8 - 5 MILES SOUTHEAST OF DOWNTOWN SEATTLE - KING COUNTY
 A FUNNEL CLOUD WAS REPORTED NEAR GENESEE PARK IN THE RAINIER VALLEY.
 
 MAY 19 - 5 MILES NORTHEAST OF MOSES LAKE - GRANT COUNTY
 AN EF0 TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN 5 MILES NORTHEAST OF MOSES LAKE WITH
 PEAK WINDS ESTIMATED AT 65 TO 85 MPH. THE TORNADO HAD A
 NON-CONTINUOUS TRACK FOR CLOSE TO A HALF MILE AND WAS ON THE GROUND
 FOR 5 MINUTES. THERE WAS SOME BARN ROOF AND SILO DAMAGE OF ESTIMATED
 $2000.
 
 MAY 28 - 4 MILES WEST OF PASCO AIRPORT - FRANKLIN COUNTY
 A WEATHER SPOTTER OBSERVED A FUNNEL CLOUD ABOUT 2000 FEET ABOVE THE
 GROUND.
 
 JUN 4 - 2 MILES SOUTH OF MONROE - SNOHOMISH COUNTY
 A WELL DEFINED FUNNEL CLOUD WAS REPORTED BY A NUMBER OF LOCAL
 SOURCES WITH PHOTOS AND VIDEO NEAR THE MONROE CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
 HONOR FARM. THE FUNNEL WAS VISIBLE FOR CLOSE TO 10 MINUTES. A SECOND
 FUNNEL CLOUD ALSO APPEARED AS THE INITIAL ONE DISSIPATED BUT LASTED
 ONLY FOR ABOUT A MINUTE.
 
 JUN 9 - 8 MILES NORTH OF CRESTON - LINCOLN COUNTY
 A FUNNEL CLOUD WAS SPOTTED 8 MILES NORTH OF CRESTON.
 
 JUN 9 - 3 MILES NORTHWEST OF ENUMCLAW AIRPORT - KING COUNTY
 A WEATHER SPOTTER SAW A SMALL BRIEF FUNNEL CLOUD.
 
 OCT 25 - 3 MILES EAST OF TOLEDO - LEWIS COUNTY
 A WEAK EF0 TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN IN A FIELD NEAR A HOME. THE PATH
 LENGTH WAS ONLY 110 YARDS. DAMAGE WAS LIMITED TO BRANCHES RIPPED OFF
 SEVERAL TREES AND SOME DECK PLASTIC. DAMAGE WAS ESTIMATED $1000.
 
 LIGHTNING
 
 THOUGH LIGHTNING OCCURRED THIS YEAR...THERE WERE NO REPORTED DEATHS
 OR INJURIES NOR ANY PROPERTY DAMAGE REPORTED.
 
 HAIL
 
 NO SEVERE SIZED HAIL - 1 INCH OR GREATER DIAMETER - WAS REPORTED
 DURING THE YEAR ALTHOUGH THERE WERE A NUMBER OF REPORTS OF 0.25 TO
 0.5 INCH DIAMETER HAIL ACROSS MUCH OF WESTERN WASHINGTON.
 
 HIGH WINDS
 
 JAN 6 - WESTERN WHATCOM COUNTY
 DURING AN EASTERLY WIND EVENT...WINDS PEAKED AT 42 MPH IN ONE
 LOCATION JUST NORTHEAST OF BELLINGHAM.
 
 JAN 11 - OLYMPICS AND NORTH COAST
 A VIGOROUS LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM OFF THE COAST GENERATED HIGH WINDS IN
 THE OLYMPIC MOUNTAINS PARTICULARLY TO AREAS EXPOSED TO SOUTHERLY
 WINDS. THE WINDS LASTED FOR 10 HOURS AND PEAKED AT NEAR 100 MPH.
 BRIEF STRONG WINDS ALSO OCCURRED ALONG THE NORTH COAST.
 
 JAN 15 - OLYMPICS...SOUTHWEST INTERIOR AND EAST PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS
 STRONG EAST WINDS AFFECTED THE EAST PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS AND
 SOUTHWEST INTERIOR AS WELL AS IN THE OLYMPICS. WINDS AT HURRICANE
 RIDGE PEAKED AT NEAR 60 MPH.
 
 JAN 18 - COAST...NORTH INTERIOR INCLUDING THE EVERETT AREA AND LAKE
 LAWRENCE NEAR YELM
 WINDS OF UP TO 72 MPH WERE REPORTED MAINLY ALONG THE COAST AND NORTH
 INTERIOR EXTENDING SOUTH INTO THE EVERETT AREA AS WELL AS THE LAKE
 LAWRENCE AREA. DAMAGES FROM THE WIND WERE ESTIMATED TO BE NEAR
 $93000.
 
 JAN 18 - EAST PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS
 EAST WINDS OF UP TO 49 MPH BLEW OUT OF THE CASCADE PASSES INTO THE
 EAST PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS INCLUDING NORTH BEND AND ENUMCLAW.
 
 MAR 13 - ADMIRALTY INLET AREA
 WINDS UP TO 58 MPH BLEW THROUGH THIS AREA. NO REPORTED DAMAGE.
 
 MAR 16 - NORTH COAST AND CENTRAL PUGET SOUND AREA
 WINDS OF UP TO 58 MPH OCCURRED ALONG THE NORTH COAST. NO REPORTED
 DAMAGE. YET WINDS UP TO 45 MPH CAUSED ABOUT $45000 IN DAMAGES TO
 STRUCTURES.
 
 MAR 28 - NORTH INTERIOR AND COAST
 WINDS OF UP TO 58 MPH BLEW IN THESE REGIONS AND PRODUCED ABOUT $2000
 IN DAMAGES TO SMALL STRUCTURES.
 
 APR 2 - COAST...NORTH INTERIOR AND CENTRAL PUGET SOUND AREA
 A STRONG LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM PASSED JUST NORTHWEST OF TATOOSH ISLAND
 AND GENERATED STRONG WINDS UP TO 79 MPH ALONG THE COAST AND 47 MPH
 IN THE INTERIOR. STRUCTURAL DAMAGES FROM THE WIND WERE ESTIMATED TO
 BE $90000.
 
 MAY 3 - MUCH OF WESTERN WASHINGTON
 AN UNSEASONABLE LATE SPRING STORM PRODUCED WINDS OF UP TO 55 MPH
 ALONG THE COAST AND 40 MPH IN THE INTERIOR. WITH LEAVES ON THE
 TREES...ABOUT 15000 CUSTOMERS LOST POWER. ABOUT $35000 IN DAMAGES
 WAS REPORTED.
 
 MAY 19 - COAST AND ADMIRALTY INLET AREA
 ANOTHER LATE SEASON STORM PRODUCED STRONG WINDS UP TO 60 MPH IN
 THESE AREAS. PROPERTY DAMAGES WERE CLOSE TO $5000.
 
 NOV 15/16 - MUCH OF WESTERN WASHINGTON
 STRONG ONSHORE FLOW FOLLOWED A STRONG COLD FRONT AND PRODUCED STRONG
 WINDS OF UP TO 64 MPH IN THE NORTH INTERIOR AND UP TO 44 MPH
 ELSEWHERE. WITH LEAVES STILL ON TREES AND WET SOILS...IT WAS EASIER
 TO KNOCK DOWN A NUMBER OF TREE LIMBS AND A FEW TREES RESULTING IN
 CLOSE TO 200000 WITHOUT POWER. DAMAGE ESTIMATES WERE NOT AVAILABLE
 YET.
 
 NOV 19-22 - NORTH INTERIOR AND CENTRAL PUGET SOUND AREAS
 A COLD WEATHER OUTBREAK BEGIN ON FRI NIGHT NOV 19 AND INTO SAT NOV
 20 IN THE NORTH INTERIOR WITH WIND SPEEDS IN THE 30-45 MPH RANGE AND
 GUSTS TO 60 MPH IN WESTERN WHATCOM COUNTY AND NORTHERN SAN JUANS.
 THE OUTFLOW WINDS SURGED AGAIN ON MON THE 22ND WITH WINDS RANGING
 FROM 30-45 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 65 MPH IN THE WESTERN WHATCOM COUNTY
 AREA AND 20-35 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 45 MPH FURTHER TO THE SOUTH THROUGH
 THE CENTRAL PUGET SOUND AREA. THESE WINDS KNOCKED DOWN A NUMBER OF
 TREES AND POWER OUT TO CLOSE TO 80000 CUSTOMERS PRIMARILY IN THE
 KITSAP PENINSULA REGION. DAMAGE ESTIMATES WERE NOT AVAILABLE YET.
 
 DEC 13/14 - COAST AND NORTH INTERIOR SOUTH THROUGH PUGET SOUND AREA
 A SQUALL LINE ASSOCIATED WITH A STRONG COLD FRONT AND EMBEDDED
 THUNDERSTORMS MOVED ONSHORE THROUGH THE AREA BRINGING ABOUT 15-30
 MINUTES OF STRONG WINDS. HOQUIAM AIRPORT REPORTED A PEAK GUST OF 70
 MPH AND REPORTS IN THE INTERIOR WERE CLOSE TO 50 MPH. IN THE WAKE OF
 A RECENT PERIOD OF HEAVY RAINS AND FLOODING...SOILS WERE QUITE WET
 MAKING IT EASIER FOR A NUMBER OF TREES TO BE BLOWN DOWN. ONE TREE
 FELL ON THE HOME OF A SOUTHWORTH WOMAN KILLING HER IN HER SLEEP. AT
 LEAST 200000 PEOPLE WERE WITHOUT POWER AT THE PEAK OF THE EVENT.
 DAMAGE ESTIMATES WERE NOT AVAILABLE YET.
 
 DEC 17-18 - EAST PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS AND SEATTLE AREA
 A STRONG ENUMCLAW WIND EVENT OCCURRED PRODUCING EAST WINDS OF 40 MPH
 WITH GUSTS UP TO 73 MPH IN THE ENUMCLAW AREA AS WELL AS OTHER EAST
 SIDE LOCATIONS LIKE NORTH BEND...MAPLE VALLEY AND BUCKLEY WITH
 LIGHTER YET STRONG WINDS EXTENDING WEST INTO THE BELLEVUE AND
 SEATTLE AREAS. 112000 CUSTOMERS LOST POWER AS TREES...POWER POLES
 AND LINES FELL. ONE HOME BURNED TO THE GROUND AS FIREFIGHTERS WERE
 UNABLE TO REACH THE HOME DUE TO DOWNED POWER POLES AND LINES ON THE
 ROADWAY. DAMAGE ESTIMATES WERE NOT AVAILABLE YET.
 
 WINTER STORMS
 
 NOV 19-22 - MUCH OF WESTERN WASHINGTON
 THE SEASONS FIRST PUSH OF MUCH COLDER AIR OCCURRED DURING THIS
 PERIOD. SNOW AMOUNTS OF 1-3 INCHES FELL IN THE NORTH PART OF THE
 NORTHERN INTERIOR ON FRI NIGHT NOV 19 INTO EARLY SAT NOV 20. A MORE
 WIDESPREAD SNOW EVENT OCCURRED WITH THIS COLD AIR OUTBREAK ON MON
 NOV 22ND WITH GENERAL 1-3 INCHES OF SNOW IN MANY AREAS BUT SOME
 LOCATIONS LIKE THE NORTHEAST OLYMPIC PENINSULA WITH UP TO FOOT OF
 SNOW IN A LAKE EFFECT SCENARIO ACROSS THE EASTERN STRAIT OF JUAN DE
 FUCA. THE SEASONS COLDEST TEMPERATURES OF THE YEAR THEN FOLLOWED
 WITH MANY LOW TEMPERATURES IN THE TEENS. DAMAGE ESTIMATES FROM THIS
 EVENT WERE NOT AVAILABLE YET.
 
 AVALANCHE
 
 FEB 28 - NEAR CRYSTAL MOUNTAIN
 A SKIER WAS INJURED WHEN AN AVALANCHE HE TRIGGERED BEYOND THE SKI
 AREA BOUNDARY SLAMMED HIM INTO A TREE.
 
 APR 9 - NEAR SNOQUALMIE PASS
 TWO PEOPLE WERE INJURED IN TWO SEPARATE AVALANCHES NEAR THE PASS.
 
 FLOODS/HEAVY RAIN/MUDSLIDES
 
 JAN 14 - CENTRAL PUGET SOUND AREA
 A PERIOD OF RAINFALL RESULTED IN A LANDSLIDE THAT CLOSED A PORTION
 OF STATE ROUTE 18 JUST WEST OF AUBURN AS WELL AS PARTS OF THE
 BURKE-GILMAN TRAIL IN LAKE FOREST PARK.
 
 JAN 17-19 - CENTRAL PUGET SOUND AREA AND THE OLYMPICS
 A PERIOD OF RAINFALL HELPED CREATE A LANDSLIDE NEAR EDMONDS THAT
 CLOSED THE RAIL LINE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND EVERETT. ANOTHER LANDSLIDE
 SOUTH OF THE PORT ANGELES CLOSED THE ROAD TO HURRICANE RIDGE.
 
 DEC 11-14 - MUCH OF WESTERN WASHINGTON
 RAINFALL OF 6 TO 11 INCHES IN THE MOUNTAINS AND 1 TO 4 INCHES IN THE
 LOWLANDS OCCURRED. FLOODING WAS WIDESPREAD WITH RECORD FLOODING ON
 TWO FORKS OF THE STILLAGUAMISH RIVER AND FIVE RIVERS EXCEEDED MAJOR
 FLOOD CATEGORY INCLUDING THE SNOHOMISH...SNOQUALMIE AND SKOKOMISH
 RIVERS. A TOTAL OF 17 MAIN STEM RIVERS EXCEEDED FLOOD STAGE. THE
 HEAVY RAIN AMOUNTS ALSO RESULTED IN A NUMBER OF SMALLER STREAMS TO
 RISE OVER THEIR BANKS AS WELL AS URBAN FLOODING OF A NUMBER OF
 ROADWAYS. OVER 50 LANDSLIDES WERE REPORTED...SOME CLOSING STATE AND
 LOCAL HIGHWAYS AS WELL AS THE MAIN NORTH-SOUTH RAIL LINE. DAMAGE
 ESTIMATES WERE NOT YET AVAILABLE.
 
 HEAT
 
 JUL 7-9 - WESTERN WASHINGTON
 STRONG HIGH PRESSURE ALOFT LED TO A MAJOR HEAT WAVE ACROSS THE AREA
 WITH MUCH OF THE REGION REACHING INTO THE 90S EACH DAY. SEVERAL
 DAILY RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES WERE SET DURING THE PERIOD INCLUDING
 95 DEGREES ON THE 8TH AT BOTH SEATAC AIRPORT AND OLYMPIA.
 
 AUG 14-16 - WESTERN WASHINGTON
 ANOTHER MAJOR HEAT WAVE GRIPPED THE AREA WITH MUCH OF THE REGION
 CLIMBING INTO THE 90S EACH DAY. SEVERAL DAILY RECORD HIGH
 TEMPERATURES WERE SET DURING THE PERIOD INCLUDING 95 DEGREES ON THE
 15TH AT OLYMPIA AND 96 DEGREES AT SEATAC AIRPORT.
 
 RECORD TEMPERATURES AND PRECIPITATION SET IN 2010
 
 HERE ARE THE HIGH...LOW AND PRECIPITATION RECORDS THAT WERE BROKEN
 DURING 2010. ENTRIES HAVE THE MONTH/DATE OF THE RECORD...WITH THE
 RECORD VALUE FOLLOWING. A (T) MEANS THAT IT WAS TIED.
 
 SEA-TAC AIRPORT (OBSERVATIONS TAKEN SINCE 1945)
 
 HIGH TEMP          LOW TEMP          PRECIPITATION
 
 01/13 56(T)       03/09 28(T)      03/25 0.62
 03/24 68          07/13 50(T)      03/29 0.92
 07/07 90          11/24 14         04/21 0.87
 07/08 95                            09/07 0.26
 07/09 93                            09/17 1.49
 08/14 95                            09/18 0.78
 08/15 96                            11/01 1.56
 11/03 74                            12/12 2.19
 
 OLYMPIA AIRPORT (OBSERVATIONS TAKEN SINCE 1942)
 
 HIGH TEMP          LOW TEMP          PRECIPITATION
 
 01/05 53(T)       02/22 21(T)      03/29 1.38
 01/09 57          03/09 23(T)      04/02 1.24
 07/08 95                            05/20 0.51
 08/14 95                            05/25 0.64
 08/15 97                            06/02 0.68
 08/25 90(T)                         06/18 0.53
                                      06/19 0.66              
                                      09/17 1.67
                                      09/18 0.85
                                      11/01 1.64
                                      12/12 1.80(T)
 
 QUILLAYUTE AIRPORT (OBSERVATIONS TAKEN SINCE 1967)
 
 HIGH TEMP          LOW TEMP          PRECIPITATION
 
 01/10 57(T)       05/07 30(T)      01/11 4.59
 01/11 55(T)       07/25 41(T)      01/14 3.41
 07/06 82          08/28 41(T)      01/15 2.27
 07/07 92                            04/07 2.29
 07/08 82(T)                         06/02 1.63
 08/14 96                            08/31 2.25
 12/07 55(T)                         09/25 2.47          
                                      09/27 1.26
                                      12/11 2.17
 
 HOQUIAM AIPORT (OBSERVATIONS TAKEN SINCE 1927)
 
 HIGH TEMP          LOW TEMP          PRECIPITATION
 
 01/09 56          02/22 30(T)      01/11 2.01
 01/11 58          05/05 32         03/11 1.39
 03/15 64          08/28 45(T)      08/31 1.17
 07/07 94          10/17 33(T)
 08/14 97
 
 BELLINGHAM AIRPORT (OBSERVATIONS TAKEN SINCE 1931)
 
 HIGH TEMP          LOW TEMP          PRECIPITATION
 
 01/11 65                            05/02 0.53
 02/13 60                            05/18 0.64
 03/16 63(T)                         05/28 0.84
 03/24 64                            08/31 0.73
 04/19 73                            09/12 0.95
 07/08 88                            12/12 1.61
 08/13 90
 08/14 88
 08/15 90
 11/03 67
 
 SEATTLE WFO AT SANDPOINT (OBSERVATIONS TAKEN SINCE 1986)
 
 HIGH TEMP          LOW TEMP          PRECIPITATION
 
 01/13 54          03/09 30(T)      01/04 0.71
 03/15 65          03/14 33         01/08 0.99
 03/20 68          03/18 34(T)      01/11 1.02
 03/24 70          04/10 34         02/26 0.39
 04/18 70          05/19 42(T)      03/29 0.66
 04/19 72          05/24 42         04/21 0.75
 07/07 84          05/30 42         05/03 0.32
 07/08 88          07/06 48         06/08 0.37 
 07/09 84          07/14 51         08/07 0.17
 08/14 91          07/17 51(T)      09/08 0.36
 08/16 91          07/18 53(T)      09/17 0.59
 08/17 89          07/19 51         09/18 0.82
 11/02 65          08/21 50         10/09 0.73
 11/03 76          08/23 50(T)      10/24 0.67
 11/04 70          08/29 50(T)      11/01 1.17
 12/07 55          08/30 51(T)      12/08 0.85
 12/08 56          10/17 40(T)      12/12 2.25
 12/13 57          11/22 24
                    11/23 19
                    11/24 18
 
 ALL OF THE ABOVE INFORMATION FOR THE YEAR WAS THROUGH MID DECEMBER.
 DAMAGE ESTIMATES FOR EVENTS LATE IN THE YEAR WERE NOT AVAILABLE YET.
 
 FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...CONTACT NWS
 SEATTLE...OR NWS PORTLAND FOR AREAS IN EXTREME SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON
 ALONG THE COLUMBIA RIVER. FOR INFORMATION IN EASTERN
 WASHINGTON...CONTACT EITHER NWS SPOKANE OR NWS PENDLETON.
 
 BUEHNER/GRUB/DAMICO/NEHER/GUY